Chennai Kadhal Music Review

Chennai Kadhal – Good in parts 

After a long gap, director Vikraman is back in business. But this time he teams up with Kadhal fame Joshua Sridhar instead of his favourite S A Rajkumar.

Joshua Sridhar, who showed promise in his maiden venture Kadhal, managed an ordinary outing in his next few movies.

Chennai Kadhal was obviously an opportunity for Joshua to prove that he is no ‘one film wonder.’

Realising the responsibility, Joshua has managed to come up with hummable scores.

A youthful entertainer as the title suggests, Vikraman and Joshua have come out with music that will appeal to the new generation.

With lyrics by Viveka and Pa Vijay and peppy beats accompanying them, the songs do manage to strike a chord.

It is good work by Joshua. But considering his potential, one can say that the young music composer certainly can do more better.

Angel Angel (Karthik, Sunitha)

A roaring beginning. With the help of additional rhythms, keyboards and electric guitars, Joshua sets the tone right at the start. An energetic tune and smooth flow of music, the song does make the listeners feel brisk.

It is a song in which a youngster describes the qualities of a lover. Karthik seems to have taken cue from legendary SPB’s romantic numbers of early 1980s. He fleshes out the emotions with aplomb. Quite catchy and trendy.

Thimirae Thimirae (Sriram Parthasarathy, Swetha)

This is certainly S A Rajkumar territory. Ponderous, the tablas, dholaks (favourites of Rajkumar) come into play. Also the tune is familiar to the ones of Rajkumar.

Sriram Parthasarathy, one of the most delightful singers around, is outstanding as only he can be. In the company of Swetha, he stands out.

Salladai Salladai (Karthik, Swetha)

Any music album is incomplete without a song based on folk music. Joshua has rendered a westernised folk song with Karthik and Swetha around. The tune gives an impression of songs often heard before. Swetha’s open-throated voice is the real attraction. Of course, that doesn’t mean Karthik is wanting. Viveka has penned the lyrics.

Enjoy Idhu Irubathu (Ranjith, Blaze)

A typical number for floor dance. This song gives an impression of listening to a song on some western music channel. With percussion instruments dominating the lyrics and a pacy rap rendered in the middle by Blaze, it is sure to go down well with the youngsters.

But towards the end the music is so loud that the lyrics of Pa Vijay go missing. It is a song set on a campus where the students celebrate the spirit of youth.

Silusilukum Silmishamae (Naresh Iyer, Kalpana)

A racy romantic duet. Joshua has again opted for peppy western beats. The beginning is very smooth with just a guitar accompanying the first few lines. Unfortunately as the song progresses, a host of instruments join in. The music composer has opted a different pattern here. The song begins on a particular tune and goes on to catch another and towards the end, it is back to where it began. Naresh Iyer and Kalpana have struck to their task.

Rendamjamam (Hariharan, Sangeetha)

Though Hariharan renders just a single number in the album, it is he who walks away with all honours. It is a melody but accompanied by peppy beats. Hariharan has sung keeping in tune with the beats and at the same time ensures that the melody is not lost. Joshua’s skillful instrumentation is another highlight of the song.

Chennai Kadhal, on the whole, is worth a listen.

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